Some of my Thoughts on the humanist advertising campaign

By | 12:30:00 2 comments
The Humanist's new advertising campaign will undoubtedly cause some Christians to criticise it. Here's a couple of thoughts:


  • Humanists have the right to advertise their beliefs just as much as Christians do.
    We all thought, and indeed prayed for the Consider Christ campaign that recently had billboards and banners on buses etc all across Ulster.
    It is a great freedom that our country permits and one that is shared by all beliefs. Any move to stop one group from holding that right, would in fact be a move to stop all groups from having this right.

  • It is a great reminder that children born within Christian marriage are not automatically Christians.
    In fact the Bible is clear that they are not Christians.
    No one is a Christian because of birth, a moral code or even a mere acknowledgment of Biblical truth. So a child can grow up in church, live a moral life and affirm Biblical teachings as true, get baptised, take communion, and yet be a non-christian.


    It is only by God's grace through faith in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ that someone becomes a Christian. More than affirming facts, this is when the Spirit of God drives them deep into the very core of our being (we describe it as our 'heart'). Our lives are transformed because we have become Christians, not in order to become Christians.

    As we see these signs around the place lets remember that our children aren't born Christians. Let this drive us to our knees in prayer to our great God, asking that He would be pleased to work into their lives. And lets make the effort to tell them of Jesus' glorious person and the works He has done.


    Further Thoughts
    One important phrase in this campaign is ". . . let me choose for myself." (I'm not sure whether the humanist society actually means this, or whether they simply want children to grow up into adults without religion, which would in fact make a hypocrisy of this campaign).

    Aside from my doubts, i actually agree that children must grow up and find their own faith and beliefs. Rather than simply going along with what our parents say, each one of us need to 'own' our faith.
    However making a choice requires knowledge so that we can make informed decisions.
    This brings me back to my point on parents teaching their kids about Jesus. In a world that increasingly teaches evolutionary and atheistic beliefs, children also have the right to hear the Christian beliefs. In fact this is a God given duty and calling for Christian parents.

  • 2 comments:

    Joel said...

    No one is a Christian because of birth, a moral code or even a mere acknowledgment of Biblical truth. So a child can grow up in church, live a moral life and affirm Biblical teachings as true, get baptised, take communion, and yet be a non-christian.

    I think it's a mistake to make the terms "Christian" and "saved" into synonyms. It's true that not everyone who is baptized or who affirms Biblical teachings will automatically be saved, but I would say that anyone who is baptized, for instance, is a member of the catholic (in the lower-case sense) Church and so can be considered a Christian, if only in a formal sense. The humanists in this case are using "Christian" to mean merely one who intellectually assents to a set of doctrines, without taking into account objective things like sacramental membership in the church. It's a very narrow definition, and one that suggests that either they are deliberately creating a straw man or they have only a very cursory familiarity with Christian doctrines.

    Boaly said...

    Yeh, i see what you're saying Joel, the label of 'Christian' is very broad, and what we mean by church can be a million things.

    And the humanist's campaign is, i believe, and as you say trying to create straw men.

    I wanted to try and break things down to the basic level. And at the end of all of it, having a small 'c' on our label counts for nothing, and it will only be those who are saved that will live eternally in Christ.

    The humanists, like most outside of the Church don't really get this, but they along with those within the church who are not saved need to hear it in hope that they move positionally into Christ.